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Black History Month Observance at DC3

Captain Lacy gave a fantastic presentation on historic African Americans in the military and shared some personal and family history and stories with
the DC3 team.
Captain Lacy gave a fantastic presentation on historic African Americans in the military and shared some personal and family history and stories with the DC3 team.

by Leah Pekofsky

February is Black History Month, and the Department of Defense Cyber Crime Center (DC3) had the honor of having Captain Tasya Y. Lacy, Commanding Officer, Navy Operational Support Center, Baltimore, MD speak at its commemorative event. Captain Lacy hails from Springfield, Ohio, and after graduating with Merit from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1997, she continued on to earn a Master of Science in Management, a certificate in Legislative Studies, and numerous service and achievement medals from the United States Navy.

Captain Lacy opened her presentation by thanking DC3 for asking her to speak, which encouraged her to reflect on her own family history and the history of the Armed Forces. Her presentation touched on important and impactful “African Americans in Times of War,” which was the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI) theme for this year’s Black History Month observance, but also included some anecdotal support in the form of stories about her children; her husband, who also serves in the U.S. Navy; and her grandfather, a WWII veteran.

“Tough times don’t last; tough people do,” she quoted, explaining that her grandfather used those words as a personal motto: one passed down to her father, and, in turn, to her. During WWII, the military services were still segregated and Captain Lacy’s grandfather, who had enlisted in the Army, bravely served under fire in a combat support role. He worked without a weapon, shuttling ammunition to white soldiers fighting on Omaha Beach in Normandy during D-Day. He told his family that he experienced more discrimination and harshness from the American military men he served with than from the enemy he faced during the war. Nonetheless, he stuck to his motto, and endured the hardships because he valued the service he was providing to his country. He eventually was able to see African Americans proudly serve and be accepted and promoted as equals in the U.S. Armed Forces.

Captain Lacy wrapped up by talking about the call to service that she experienced: how she received that legacy from her father and grandfather, and now passes it on to her children. She talked about the importance of black history to American history, and about the true purpose of serving one’s country: to make the world a better place. The final point that she left the team with was that she could not have accomplished what she has in her career without the brave men and women who achieved greatness before her. Black history is American history, and without America’s diverse, rich history, we would not be where we are today.

“Because of them, we did and will continue to do,” she said.